Eye Disorders

Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

One million Canadians have some form of AMD, the leading cause of vision loss in Canada. More Canadians have AMD than breast cancer, prostate cancer, Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s disease combined. Yet few of us even know that it affects the eyes.

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Astigmatism

In normal, undistorted vision, the cornea (the clear window in front of the eye) is smooth and equally curved in all directions. With astigmatism, the cornea is “warped”, meaning it curves more in one direction than the other distorting or blurring vision for objects at any distance.

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Cataracts

More than 2.5 million Canadians have cataracts. They are painless, develop within the existing lenses in your eyes, and are usually detected during routine eye exams.

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Glaucoma

Glaucoma is the second most common cause of vision loss in seniors in Canada. More than 250,000 Canadians have chronic open-angle glaucoma, the most common form of the disease

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Retinal Pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of diseases which tend to run in families and cause slow, but progressive loss of vision. The retina is the tissue which lines the inside of the eye and sends visual images to the brain..

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Retinal Detachment

Retinal detachment is a serious problem that usually affects middle-aged or older people. If it isn’t treated immediately, it will lead to vision problems or even vision loss.

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Lazy Eye (Amblyopia)

Amblyopia (‘lazy eye’) happens when the vision in one eye doesn’t develop properly in early childhood. You may not be able to notice it easily in your child, but if it isn’t treated it will become a permanent visual problem.

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